Perthshire Scotland > Towns > Comrie Guide > About Comrie

Comrie is in the heart of the scenic West Strathearn area of Perthshire. Situated at the meeting of Glens Lednock and Artney with the Scottish Highlands rising to the north. The village has a variety of interesting shops and businesses along it's tidy main street.

The Lednock leads up to the Deil's Cauldron waterfall and above this the village is overlooked by a hilltop granite obelisk commemorating Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville (1742-1811).

The Romans call the village Victoria, then the Picts called it Aberlednock. Comrie itself is a Gaelic name given by the Scots who invaded in the 7-8thC.

 

Comrie White Church
White Church
Comrie Community Centre

Mary Queen of Scots often hunted with Darnley around 1565 in the Royal forests in Glen Artney, south of Comrie. This later inspired Sir Walter Scott to use Glen Artney in The Lady of the Lake.

By the end of the 18thC roads passed through the area and the River Earn had been bridged. The spinning of linen yarn had become the local industry.

The first post office opened in Comrie in 1807. In 1893 the railway arrived as a branch line from Crieff. By 1904 the line had been extended along Loch Earn to join with the Oban line at Lochearnhead.

Scene of many minor earthquakes in the past, Comrie lies on the Highland Boundary Fault and has earned the nickname the Shakin' Toon. Earthquake House is one of the oldest permanent seismic observatories.

Nearby is Drummond Trout Farm offering both great trout fishing and an entertaining day out for the whole family.

 

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